Faculty & Staff

Judy Ledgerwood

Ph.D., Cornell, 1990; Professor
Director of Center for Southeast Asian Studies

Professor Ledgerwood is a cultural anthropologist whose research interests include violence, memory, the re-construction of meaning in post-war and diaspora communities and gender. Her current research is focused on Cambodian Buddhism, violence and ideas of cultural identity. Professor Ledgerwood's dissertation was on changing Khmer conceptions of gender in Khmer refugee communities in the United States. She has taught as a visiting professor at Cornell University and the Royal University of Fine Arts in Phnom Penh, and was a research fellow at the East-West Center in Honolulu. She serves on the board of the Cambodian American Heritage Museum and Killing Fields Memorial in Chicago. 

Professor Ledgerwood teaches general cultural anthropology, anthropology and human diversity, history and theory of anthropology, women in cross cultural perspectives, Asian-American cultures, anthropology of gender, the anthropology of violence and peoples and cultures of mainland Southeast Asia.

Selected Publications

A Tale of Two Temples:  Communities and their Wats IN Village Community and the Transforming Social Order in Cambodia and Thailand:  Essays in Honor of May Ebihara. John Marston, ed.  Melbourne: Monash University. 2011.

Is the Trial of 'Duch' a Catalyst for Change in Cambodia's Courts?  AsiaPacific Issues, no. 95 (Honolulu: East-West Center, June, 2010), With Kheang Un. 2010.

Ritual in 1990 Cambodian Political Theatre:  New Songs at the Edge of the Forest, IN At the Edge of the Forest:  Essays on Cambodia, History and Narrative in Honor of David Chandler.  Edited volume with Anne Hansen, Ithaca, NY:  Cornell Southeast Asian Studies Program, p. 195-220. 2008.

Buddhist Practice in Rural Kandal Province 1960 and 2003:  An Essay in Honor of May Ebihara IN People of Virtue: Reconfiguring Religion, Power and Moral Order in Cambodia Today. David Chandler and Alix Kent, eds. Nordic Institute of Asian Studies, p. 147-168. 2008.

Global Concepts and Local Meaning: Human Rights and Buddhism in Cambodia. J. Ledgerwood and Kheang Un. Journal of Human Rights 2 (4): 531-549. 2003

Rural Development in Cambodia: The View from the Village In Cambodia and the International Community: The Quest for Peace, Development, and Democracy Frederick Brown and David Timberman, ed. New York, NY: Asia Society, pp 127-147, 1998

Does Cambodia Exist?: Nationalism and Diasporic Constructions of a Homeland. In Diasporic Identities: Selected Papers on Refugee and Immigrant Issues. Carol A. Mortland, ed. Washington, DC: American Anthropological Association, pp. 92-112, 1998.

The Cambodian Tuol Sleng Museum of Genocidal Crimes: National Narrative. Museum Anthropology, 21(1): 82-98, 1997.